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There has never been a more urgent time than now to support migratory birds and protect their future

To quote our prestigious partners at National Geographic, birds are the most extraordinary and accessible avatars of the natural world. They pause in our backyards and at our bird feeders along their incredible migrations, singing in the dawn and reminding us of the interconnected web we live in from north to south pole. Birds inspire us with their beauty, their grace, and their tenacity.

They serve as sentinels for the health of ecosystems; by monitoring their movements we can detect threats to habitats and biodiversity earlier than we would otherwise, and in addressing those threats we see what’s good for the birds is inevitably good for us as well. At Siwash Lake, watch birds amid a rare, post-wildfire snag forest.


   

 

Observing & Protecting our Friends of Flight at Siwash lake


Songbirds, Waterfowl, Birds of Prey, Woodpeckers, Grassland, Wading and Shore Birds... we have numerous species of each at Siwash.

From the rare, prehistoric-type Sandhill Crane to the not-so-Common Loon, you'll enjoy observing our feathered friends in their natural surroundings.

They range from small and difficult-to-spot songbirds to the majestic Bald Eagle. Most of the species here undertake long migrations every year.

Now that a massive wildfire has created a unique and sensitive eco-system at Siwash, we anticipate that we will be seeing some rare, transitional species to excite even the most accomplished birder.

The Black Backed Woodpecker, for instance, adapted by millions of years of evolution, thrives in burned-out forests.


 


Bird watching on Siwash Lake - Birding is a delightful leisurely pursuit amid Nature  

Discover a New Passion while at Siwash


Research has proven that being in Nature can reduce stress and boost mental well-being, and a growing number of studies specifically suggest that watching birds and encouraging birds to visit or live in your yard is good for you.

A recent leisure study found that about 5% of North Americans, age 6 or older, participated in bird watching and the percentage has been climbing, especially in younger age groups. Birding is cool! You don’t need much, just your eyes and ears and a sense of curiosity.


In the bird watching community, there is a difference between a birdwatcher and a birder. A birdwatcher is someone who enjoys watching birds a bit closer to home, while a birder is someone who will travel far and wide to spot a rare species of bird. At Siwash, we cater to both.